Level Up your Game!

Postby Ramma » April 13th, 2016, 6:19 am

Graham Wolfe put out a bunch of SFV related tips on dealing with stuff, common stuff that you see. I guess this technically falls under level up your game:

https://grahamwolfeblog.wordpress.com/

i.e.:

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Postby Angelus » April 13th, 2016, 7:33 am

I think general discussion is a better spot for this since it's all character specific stuff.
Also, not all of it is even true, like the Chun Li, Laura and Birdie bit for example.
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Postby Ralenzo » April 13th, 2016, 9:54 am

An "Everything You Need To Know" - Thread might come in handy.
Which would have things like:
- Character colors/costumes
- Frame data and hitboxes
- Unlisted frame data (VT total frames, V-reversals, Stamina/Stun rankings, etc.)
- Links to character guides

Ya know, things that aren't necessarily related to leveling up as a player.
We can drop whatever interesting or handy information we might find, and then let it be added to the original post for easy access.

Thoughts? :shrug:
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Postby Ramma » April 20th, 2016, 6:08 am

Pretty long read, but an article on adapting to your opponent:

http://rsd-series.com/guides/84-lll-rsd ... tion-model
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Postby Ralenzo » May 17th, 2016, 2:19 pm

phpBB [video]


No idea why I never thought of this myself.
I tried it today and it's pretty effective, it gives u a lot of information in a safe manner.
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Postby Ramma » May 28th, 2016, 2:54 pm

Machaboo: Finally, how to understand your opponent's feelings, and thoughts.

This is the most difficult thing of all, but in my opinion it is the single most important thing in the entirety of fighting games.

In fighting games, you can gather information about your opponent based on what the screen tells you. For example, there are projectile moves in fighting games. I suppose the most famous one is the "Hadouken".

The Hadouken functions just as it looks on the screen - it's an attack which separates itself from its user, and keeps moving forward on its own. The Hadouken differs depending on the character and the game in question, but if you want to counter it you have no choice but to jump forward.

Machaboo: Using this statement as a basis, let's think about a mid-game situation. "I fired two Hadouken, and after that my opponent jumped forward".

If that's the situation, then try thinking as to WHY your opponent jumped, and in 8 or 9 cases out of 10, the answer will be "They dislike the Hadouken, so they jumped forward to defeat it".

I just used the Hadouken as a general example, but there are many situations where you discern your opponent's train of thought, and in doing so, the reading game between the two players makes the game more fun, and you will get stronger as a competitor.

If I understand my opponent's thoughts, but they don't understand mine, the difference in knowledge will give me an overwhelming victory. When it's like this, you can basically pull the strings to make your opponent dance any way you want them to.

When you feel a difference in level, and see completely dominant matches, this is often the source of that.

By the way, it's often said that you'll get better by using standard characters, but that's only because they are more likely to unlock your yomi potential and let you start reading your opponent.

If you use a strange character, and keep winning because your opponent doesn't really understand your character, there can be matches that don't even have a reading game between the players.

In those cases, you won't be getting any practice at reading your opponent, and it'll become a hindrance to your development as a player.

Standard characters are easy to understand, so unless you have some basic yomi to read your opponent with, you won't be able to win. Because of this, standard characters will push you to reading your opponent, which makes it easier to get better as a player.

I generally recommend standard characters to new players, but not only because they tend to have simple execution, but also because of this very reason.

To understand the reasoning of your opponent's chosen moves against yours, you need knowledge and experience, so this isn't something you're going to pick up straight away, but this is the most important thing in fighting games when you reach the final stages.

So because of that, once you start getting used to the controls, I think it's a good idea to keep close track of your opponent's thought process while playing.

If you happen to go up against a top-level player, put your will into your moves and use them with purpose. If you do, it becomes fun trying to respond with solid answers, haha.

Keeping all of this in mind, the rest is just to think, think, think, and have fun while doing so.

"Defeat your opponent within 99 seconds" or "Have more HP left than your opponent does once the 99 seconds run out" - these are the two possible victory conditions in fighting games, so engrave these major principles in your heart and keep thinking while you're playing.

Having fun is good, by doing so it becomes easier to play and easier to have flashes of insight, which makes it easier to level up as a player~.

We've also reached an age where it's easy for top players to teach. Of course, teaching isn't a bad thing at its core, but if you're only taught what to do all the time and don't put your own thoughts into it, you're not going to grow. Before you ask, think about it on your own and try to find an answer. That's important.

This became pretty long, but I'll end my presentation on how to advance as a player here. If it ends up helping you, that'd make me very happy.

Finally, it's not like pressing the button harder makes your attack stronger. There's nothing like that in fighting games. If you use the same character, everyone has the same potential strength. Everyone is equal, and it becomes a battle of wits against your opponent, which decides the outcome. That's the best thing abvout fighting games, I think.

If, perhaps, someone who hasn't played fighting games happened to read this writeup, please give them a try!

I'd really like to see more and more people playing fighting games.

Thank you!


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Postby Ramma » August 10th, 2016, 7:04 am

Advice from Xian about conditioning your opponent and more: http://www.eventhubs.com/news/2016/aug/ ... fighter-5/
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